Damson Poets on World Poetry Day and Brexit

This is a reblog from Damson Poets about their recent celebration of the human spirit in the midst of our collective meltdown!

On Wednesday 29th of March, Damson Poets hosted a special event for World Poetry Day showcasing poetry in 13 different languages: Russian, Italian, German, Japanese, Greek, American, French, Spanish, Arabic, Chinese, Portugese, and Welsh. There were also English readings on the open-mic.

The event took place at the Ham & Jam Coffee Shop and was organised by Martin Domleo (Damson Poets) and Feixia Yu (UCLan Confucius Institute) who brought together most of the international readers. Our finale was performed by Clwb Siarad – Preston’s Welsh Club. Seventy people attended in total. My role was MCing.

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Reblog: closing doors & opening windows

Award winning  poet, Vera Wabegijig, published her first book, Wild Rice Dreams, after 20 years of writing poetry. She shares poems, and her life, with readers through her blog of the  same title.

This week she posted about her ongoing journey of art making, service and healing. I am grateful to her for allowing me to share it with you. She began:

For four and a half years I had the pleasure to work at a local Indigenous women’s centre here in Ottawa as a cultural programmer. Over the years I put my energy in service of Indigenous women and children who came through the doors. The mandate is to serve Indigenous women and their families who are escaping domestic abuse, healing from intergenerational trauma, survivors of residential school, and who want a place to feel safe in an urban world. I learned so much about myself, my path, and my passion. The work itself was rewarding and it helped me to clarify where I really want to go with my love for language and my passion for writing. It challenged my worldview, ideologies, and beliefs. It was really life changing.

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Andrea Stephenson on February’s Doubts

Andrea Stephenson’s writing and photography are grounded in place, and in her deep and abiding sense of spirituality. In this post, February’s Doubts,  she considers the light and shadow that is February, and reflects on creativity in difficult times. I am grateful to her for allowing me to share it with you.

February is the fag end of winter.  Though I love this season, this is the point when I’m ready for spring, for light, for warmth.  This is the point at which the cold and dark tires me and I trudge through the days simply surviving.  When it is no longer as easy to connect with that self I find in the rich, dark dreaming.  I have woken up, but rudely.  February is the alarm that wakes me when I’m not ready to wake, interrupting a peaceful sleep.  It is the truculent moment when I haul myself out of bed before I’m ready, to a day that I’m not looking forward to.  A transition time, but not the lazy transition of summer into autumn, or the barely perceptible change from autumn to winter.  February is hard work. Read more!

Reblog: Daily Struggles of a Disabled Woman

Visual Storyteller Gaia Calcagni Merlini is the Edge of Humanity Magazine contributor of this documentary photography. From project ‘Anna‘. Earlier this year, probably around February, a friend told me she was working as a carer for a lady met on the street. I was instantly interested in meeting this woman. I can’t […]

via Daily Struggles Of A Disabled Woman In Hackney, London — Edge of Humanity Magazine

Reblogged from Gaele Sobott:“I Think of Dance as My Most Honest and Purest Form of Expression . . .” An interview with Christelle Dreyer — Gaele Sobott

Christelle Dreyer is a freelance graphic designer and dancer who lives in Brackenfell, Cape Town. She took up competitive ballroom and Latin dancing in 2004, then moved onto contemporary dance in 2010, performing in Dance Joint produced by Jazzart Dance Theatre and choreographed by Jackie Manyaapelo, Infecting the City, choreographed by Tebogo Munyai, and Unmute Project, […]

via “I Think of Dance as My Most Honest and Purest Form of Expression . . .” An interview with Christelle Dreyer — Gaele Sobott

Raise your banners — Shoddy exhibition

Political banners, with their traditions reaching back through the labour movement, have something in common with the Shoddy exhibition. Being fabric-based is the obvious connection, with a skillful use of embroidery, appliqué and painting to convey a strong message. Banners often carry a message of protest or resistance, but are as often about identity, pride, […]

via Raise your banners — Shoddy exhibition

Being Atypical at London’s Southbank Centre, 6th September 2016 — kaiteoreilly

AWe need more of this! Thanks, Kaite! (The photo is from Kaite’s post!)

I love a good chat, so am delighted to confirm I’ll be in conversation on 6th September at Southbank Centre, with the London launch of my selected plays Atypical Plays for Atypical Actors. The event is part of the Unlimited Festival 6-11 September 2016: “a festival of theatre, dance, music, literature, comedy and visual […]

via Being Atypical at London’s Southbank Centre, 6th September 2016 — kaiteoreilly

Brief Interviews with Native Playwrights!

Jason Grasl Lying with Badgers by Jason Grasl (Blackfeet)A Blackfeet man faces his troubled relationship with his late father and his culture when he returns to his estranged family’s remote mountain home.Jason GraslWhat is your favorite thing about playwriting? The idea of ultimate creative freedom in any directionWhat is your least favorite thing about playwriting?The realization of the…

via Meet the Playwrights – Festival of New Plays — Native Voices @ the Autry

Reblog: Broadway’s Race Casting Controversy

Asian American actors and performers have gathered forces to figure out the meaning behind a slew of statistics. Data revealed in a 2012 study has found the smoking gun — that Asian American performers are not part of “the trend toward more inclusive casting” in New York theater.

via BROADWAY’S RACE CASTING CONTROVERSY | Why are Asian Americans invisible on NYC stages? — in the culture of one world

Reblog: In the culture of casting equality

According to the new statistical report, “MCC Theater was the only theatre studied that hired no minority actors at all this season,” the report said.

via THE BEST AND WORST | In the culture of casting equality, NY’s MCC Theater gets a thumbs-down — in the culture of one world